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1 edition of Wage and productivity dispersion in U.S. manufacturing found in the catalog.

Wage and productivity dispersion in U.S. manufacturing

Wage and productivity dispersion in U.S. manufacturing

the role of computer investment

by

  • 198 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wage differentials -- United States -- Effect of automation on.,
  • Computers -- Economic aspects -- United States.,
  • Manufacturing industries -- United States -- Automation.,
  • Industrial productivity -- United States -- Effect of automation on.,
  • Labor market -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementTimothy Dunne ... [et.al.].
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 7465, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 7465.
    ContributionsDunne, Timothy., Foster, Lucia, Haltiwanger, John C., Troske, Kenneth R. 1962-, National Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination49, [12] p. :
    Number of Pages49
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22393837M

    Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF.   A. Introduction, and the Record on Productivity Growth There is nothing more important to long term economic growth than the growth in productivity. And as shown in the chart above, productivity (measured here by real GDP in dollars per worker employed) is now over $, This is times what it was in (when. From to , labor productivity—defined as output per hour—increased in 13 of the 21 3-digit NAICS manufacturing industries. [ Chart data ] Productivity rose the fastest in primary metals manufacturing and in computer and electronic products manufacturing, two industries where output increased rapidly but hours fell. In Wage Dispersion Dale Mortensen examines the reasons for pay differentials in the other 70 percent. He finds that these differentials, or wage dispersion, are largely the result of job search friction (which arises when workers do not know the wages offered by all employers) and cross-firm differences in wage policy and productivity."--Jacket.


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Wage and productivity dispersion in U.S. manufacturing Download PDF EPUB FB2

Wage and Productivity Dispersion in U.S. Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment Abstract By exploiting establishment-level data, this paper sheds new light on the source of the changes in the structure of production, wages, and employment that have occurred over the last several decades.

Faggio, Salvanes, and Van Reenen: w The Evolution of Inequality in Productivity and Wages: Panel Data Evidence: Hellerstein, Neumark, and Troske: w Wages, Productivity, and Worker Characteristics: Evidence from Plant-Level Production Functions and Wage Equations: Davis and Haltiwanger: w Wage Dispersion Between and Within U.S.

Manufacturing. Wage and Productivity Dispersion in U.S. Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment Article (PDF Available) December with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Timothy Dunne & Lucia Foster & John Haltiwanger & Kenneth Troske, "Wage and Productivity Dispersion in U.S. Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment," Working PapersCenter for Economic Studies, U.S.

Census Bureau. Get this from a library. Wage and productivity dispersion in U.S. manufacturing: the role of computer investment. [Timothy Dunne; National Bureau of Economic Research.;]. Wage and Productivity Dispersion in U.S. Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment By exploiting establishment-level data, this paper sheds new light on the sources of the changes in the structure of production, wages, and employment that have occurred over the last several decades.

We investigate the following two related hypotheses. dispersion in wage and productivity, and the relation between the two, in order to determine the extent to which each of the two stories can account for the observations in the case of Danish data.

Our model of wage determination is composed of the. Dunne, Timothy, Lucia Foster, John Haltiwanger, and Kenneth Troske. Wage and productivity dispersion in U.S. manufacturing: The role of computer investment.

NBER Working Paper No. (revised). Google ScholarCited by: 1. In order to provide a long run picture of the wage-productivity elasticity let us begin with aggregate manufacturing data. Fig. 1, left panel, shows the wage-productivity elasticities, i.e.

the ratio between the percentage change of real wage and the percentage change of labour productivity, for China’s manufacturing sector since (both annual, black line, and three years moving Author: Giovanni Dosi, Maria Enrica Virgillito, Maria Enrica Virgillito, Xiaodan Yu.

wages and firm productivity, and thus ties the dispersion in productivity to the wage distribution. Hence, as wage dispersion motivates job search (see, e.g., Christensen, Lentz, Mortensen, Neumann, and Werwatz, ), rent sharing is a potentially impor-tant vehicle for labor reallocation. To date there has been no quantitative assessment.

Minimum wages and labour productivity Recent studies have shown that minimum wages not only help to reduce wage dispersion and to channel productivity gains into higher wages, but they also can contribute to higher labour productivity – both at the enterprise level and at the aggregate economy-wide Size: KB.

This column presents new firm-level data on the increasing dispersion of wages and productivity in both the manufacturing and services sectors in 16 OECD countries. Wage inequalities are growing between firms, even those operating in the same sector—and they are linked to growing differences between high and low productivity firms.

Brookings Papers: Microeconomics Figure 1. Inequality Measures for Hourly Wages in U.S. Manufacturing, - - Coefficient of variation wage levels. Wage and Productivity Dispersion in United States Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment Timothy Dunne, University of Oklahoma Lucia Foster, U.S.

Bureau of the Census John Haltiwanger, University of Maryland Kenneth R. Troske, University of Missouri—Columbia Using establishment-level data, we shed light on the sources of the. Downloadable. By exploiting establishment-level data for U.S. manufacturing, this paper sheds new light on the source of the changes in the structure of production, wages, and employment that have occurred over the last several decades.

Based on recent theoretical work by Caselli () and Kremer and Maskin (), we focus on empirically investigating the following two. where BV it represents the book value of firm i’s tangible fixed assets in year t, INK jt stands for the net capital stock of industry j in constant prices, and IBV jt denotes the book value of industry j’s capital.

INK jt was calculated as follows. First, as a benchmark, we took the data on the book value of tangible fixed assets in from the Financial Statements Cited by: Wage and Productivity Dispersion in U.S.

Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment Timothy Dunne, Lucia Foster, John Haltiwanger, and Kenneth Troske NBER Working Paper No. January JEL No. J3, O3 ABSTRACT By exploiting establishment-level data, this paper sheds new light on the source of the changes in.

Great Divergences: The growing dispersion of wages and productivity in OECD countries Over the last three decades, several OECD and non-OECD economies have experienced increasing inequality in income between the rich and the poor (PikettyPiketty et al.OECD ). This has put growth and inclusiveness at the forefront of academic and policy.

Some firms pay well while others don’t; and some are highly productive while many aren’t. This column presents new firm-level data on the increasing dispersion of wages and productivity in both the manufacturing and services sectors in 16 OECD countries.

Wage inequalities are growing between firms, even those operating in the same sector – and they. form of liberalized market economy, but with widely varying paces of reform.

Using U.S. productivity dispersion as a benchmark, as in Hsieh and Klenow (), we track productivity dispersion in the manufacturing sectors back into the planning period and as they liberalize, someFile Size: 1MB. Manufacturing Wage and Productivity Stability Wage and productivity stability in U.S.

manufacturing plants Wages and productivity were substantially dispersed across all manufacturing plants inbut the dispersion narrowed modestly from then until ; the connection between a plant’s level of productivity and its hourly wages weakened.

Mean annual wage in the U.S., by major occupational group Total compensation per employee, by industry U.S. Wage and salary of U. in Section 3 and present the data set in Section 4. The impact of intra-firm wage dispersion on firm productivity is analysed in Section 5. Section 6 concludes. Review of the literature Wage dispersion and firm productivity The theoretical literature disagrees on how intra-firm wage dispersion may affect productivity.

A $16 per hour minimum wage—in line with what we paid minimum-wage workers in relative to the productivity level of the time—would be equal to, or higher than, the earnings of half of all U.S.

workers. That is a radically different world from the one we now inhabit. Obviously, workers at the bottom would be earning much more. 3 Figure 2. Within-sector dispersion of wages and productivity increased faster at the bottom.

Panel A: Wage dispersion(top versus bottom) Panel B: Productivity dispersion (top versus bottom) Log Wage () Note: The figure in panel A [resp. B] plots the estimated year dummies of a regression of logwage [resp.

logMFP] - -File Size: KB. The TFP gains calculated here are somewhat comparable to those of Lee, Hwang and Seol () who reported that the TFP gains in and were % and %, respectively. These TFP gains are much lower than those in Ji and Jeong (), who used the industry capital income share of the U.S.

manufacturing reported that the TFP. blue-collar hourly wage distribution in the United Kingdom would have required a relative increase of more than % and for a U.S. manufac-turing employee the requisite increase was over %.6 The effects of wage distribution on productive efficiency is a topic rich in theoretical conjecture, has been the object of vigorous Scandinavian polem.

Abstract. I study the distribution of income across the factors of production within the canonical on-the-job search framework. I show that, by weakening the competition between employers, a mean-preserving spread of the employers’ productivity distribution decreases the share of the production output that the workers : Damir Stijepic.

Wage and productivity data key to manufacturing In this two-minute video brief, RSM US Chief Economist Joseph Brusuelas explains why wage growth and productivity are the keys to tracking the health of U.S. manfuacturing. "You just can’t get away from the productivity question, "Brusuelas explains.

Productivity is the most important determinant of the growth in living standards over the long run and its growth has been weak since and dismal since The simplest productivity measure i.

The Cyclicality of Productivity Dispersion, Matthias Kehrigy Decem Abstract Using plant-level data, I show that the dispersion of total factor productivity levels in U.S.

manufacturing is greater in recessions than in booms. This phenomenon is particularly pro-nounced in durables and primarily re.

Deregulation of U.S. telecommunications equipment manufacturing is associated with increased, not reduced, productivity dispersion, and every transition economy in our sample shows a sharp rise in dispersion after liberalization.

Productivity dispersion under central planning is similar to that in the U.S., and it rises faster in. productivity growth. We examine the dynamic relationship be tween entry, productivity dispersion, and productivity growth using a new comprehensive firm -level dataset for the U.S.

We find a surge of entry within an industry yields an immediate increase in productivity dispersion and a lagged increase in productivity growth.

Kehrig () presents evidence for a countercyclical dispersion of (revenue) productivity in U.S. manufacturing. Asker, Collard-Wexler, and De Loecker () show how risk and adjustment costs in capital accumulation can rationalize dispersion of firm-level revenue productivity.

Following their observation, our model allows for the possibility Cited by: Labor Market Fluidity and Economic Performance wage growth and career advancement (Topel and Ward, find rising volatility of plant-level productivity shocks in U. Another method for boosting productivity is offered by Northwestern University economist Robert Gordon—one of the country’s leading productivity experts—in his recent book The Rise and Fall.

Entering cohorts in the United States have a larger than average dispersion of productivity, but this dispersion is reduced as the cohort ages and the less productive firms exit. These patterns reflect market experimentation of new entrants, and the subsequent learning and selection dynamics for young businesses plays an important role in U.S.

This paper explores the evolution of the average wage of employees over the life-cycle of a manufacturing plant. The average wage starts out low for a new plant and increases along with labor productivity as the plant ages.

As a plant approaches exit, its average wage falls, but more slowly than it rises in the case of growing plants. Moreover, the average wage does Cited by: 1. The gap between real hourly compensation and labor productivity is a "wage gap" that indicates whether workers' compensation is keeping up with productivity.

Since the s, growth in inflation-adjusted, or real, hourly compensation—a measure of workers' purchasing power—has lagged behind labor productivity growth.

A Panel Study of Manufacturing Industries ABSTRACT This paper investigates the long-run relationship between prices and wage-adjusted productivity as well as between real wages and average labor productivity at the industry level for a panel of US manufacturing industries over the period Our approach.

FIG,Wage dispersion among blue-collar workers in the Swedish private sector. Sources: Authors' computations and data supplied by SAF, LO, and Metall. blue-collar hourly wage distribution in the United Kingdom would have required a relative increase of more than % and for a U.S.

manufacturing employee the requisite increase was over %.~.After splitting the sample into manufacturing and non-manufacturing firms, one finds that in both types of industries the mean labor productivity, TFP, and wage rate are significantly higher for unionized firms (see Table 2).

Union productivity effects are observed not only in manufacturing firms but also in non-manufacturing firms and the Cited by: states and a collection of metropolitan areas in the U.S. between and Using measures of overall, between-education-group, and residual inequality, I find that wage dispersion falls significantly as industry employment expands.

JEL: J31, R11 Keywords: Wage Inequality, Localization, Agglomeration Economies.